Securing the Nest Thermostat

A group of hackers are using a vulnerability in the Nest thermostat to secure it against Nest’s remote data collection.

More here

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Fingerprinting Computers By Making Them Draw Images

Here’s a new way to identify individual computers over the Internet. The page instructs the browser to draw an image. Because each computer draws the image slightly differently, this can be used to uniquely identify each computer. This is a big deal, because there’s no way to block this right now.

Article. Hacker News thread.

EDITED TO ADD (7/22): This technique was first described in 2012. And it seems that NoScript blocks this. Privacy Badger probably blocks it, too.

More here

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

NASDAQ Hack

Long article on a sophisticated hacking of the NASDAQ stock exchange.

More here

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Hackers Steal Personal Information of US Security-Clearance Holders

The article says they were Chinese but offers no evidence:

The intrusion at the Office of Personnel Management was particularly disturbing because it oversees a system called e-QIP, in which federal employees applying for security clearances enter their most personal information, including financial data. Federal employees who have had security clearances for some time are often required to update their personal information through the website.

This is a big deal. If I were a government, trying to figure out who to target for blackmail, bribery, and other coercive tactics, this would be a nice database to have.

More here

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

How Google Glass Snoops Steal Your Passcode

Researchers are refining the techniques of surreptitiously videoing people as they type in their passwords.

Other hackers have shown it’s possible to perform automated over-the-shoulder password stealing. But Fu notes that older video tools had to actually see the display, which often is impossible from a distance or from indirect angles. (See UMass’s PIN-capturing footage taken by Glass in the GIF below.) His team’s video recognition software can spot passcodes even when the screen is unreadable, based on its understanding of an iPad’s geometry and the position of the user’s fingers. It maps its image of the angled iPad onto a “reference” image of the device, then looks for the abrupt down and up movements of the dark crescents that represent the fingers’ shadows.

Slashdot thread.

More here

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Please update Flash on your systems

Here's why: http://miki.it/blog/2014/7/8/abusing-jsonp-with-rosetta-flash/ – technical stuff, believe me, you wanna patch.

More here

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Hooray for the unloved Windows Home Server

Yes, I know, it’s defunct and all that, but I still love it.

I have an old HP MediaSmart Server chugging along here which I use as primary storage for a lot of work stuff.  Anyway, one of its drives failed the other day when it suddenly lost power.

I had been having some trouble with that drive for a little while, so wasn’t surprised and had a new drive ready as a replacement.  I’d already pulled the drive and run a chkdsk /r which identified some bad sectors, before putting the drive back and crossing my fingers.

I wasn’t able to successfully “remove” the failing drive using the WHS Wizard; I think because some bad sectors were preventing completion of the process. So, I powered down the server, removed the drive, powered up, “removed” the now missing drive using the Wizard then added a new one.

Because I had mirroring enabled for my most important folders, it looked like I hadn’t lost anything (there’s the *yay*).

I did, however, discover a short while ago that some older files were missing, but even that proved to not be a problem. I popped the failing drive into an external SATA bay from StarTech, navigated to DE/SHARES and was able to copy over nearly all of the missing files, except for some bits and pieces affected by the bad sectors.  The process took just minutes, instead of hours.

More here

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Trojan:W32/Lecpetex: Bitcoin miner spreading via FB messages

In early March this year, while investigating various threats as part of our Facebook malware cleanup effort, we ran across an interesting one that was spreading in zipped files attached to messages.

The messages themselves were classic social engineering bait that lead the users to install the executable file in the attachment, which turned out to be a Bitcoin miner, which we identify as Trojan:W32/Lecpetex.

Some of the more interesting details of our analysis are presented in our Lecpetex whitepaper.

lecpetex_cover (66k image)

Facebook’s own investigation into Lecpetex lead to an operation to take down the botnet. More details about their takedown effort, and the results from their parallel analysis of the malware, are available here.

Post by — Mangesh

Updated to add details and link to Facebook’s takedown post.

On 09/07/14 At 03:22 AM

More here

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Here’s How Brazilian Crooks Steal Billions

Man-in-the-middle attack against a Brazilian payment system:

Brazil has an extremely active and talented cybercrime underground, and increasingly Brazilian organized crime gangs are setting their sights on boleto users who bank online. This is typically done through malware that lies in wait until the user of the hacked PC visits their bank’s site and fills out the account information for the recipient of a boleto transaction. In this scenario, the unwitting victim submits the transfer for payment and the malware modifies the request by substituting a recipient account that the attackers control.

This is the sort of attack that bypasses any two-factor authentication system, since it occurs after all authentication has happened. A defense would be to send a confirmation notice to another device the account-owner owns, confirming the details of the transaction.

More here

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

ALERT XP USERS: You can continue to update Java, but you’re on your own if you have issues…

Java 7 is no longer supported on XP, although the website points out that "Users may still continue to use Java 7 updates on Windows XP at their own risk, but support will only be provided against Microsoft Windows releases Windows Vista or later".  My strong recommendation is to uninstall the application.

Cite: http://java.com/en/download/help/sysreq.xml

More here

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment